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Original Light

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  1. Lundy liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Your best LSPDFR screenshots?   
    Please read the new notice posted at the top of the page before posting.
  2. liamxxs liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Slow PC   
    Upgrade your components, that's really the only way to increase your speed in games.
     
    I don't really tend to like the "snake oil" software that tend to claim they will legitimately make your PC faster. As long as you don't have any viruses, and defragment your drive every once in a while, you generally wont see a huge improvement with any software.
  3. liamxxs liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Slow PC   
    Upgrade your components, that's really the only way to increase your speed in games.
     
    I don't really tend to like the "snake oil" software that tend to claim they will legitimately make your PC faster. As long as you don't have any viruses, and defragment your drive every once in a while, you generally wont see a huge improvement with any software.
  4. Kallus Rourke liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Meet Your Moderator - Kallus Rourke   
     
    It's not a lie.
     
    We have unearthly delights in the staff forums. 
  5. Original Light liked a post in a topic by Kallus Rourke in Meet Your Moderator - Kallus Rourke   
     
    Y u always lyin.
  6. Kallus Rourke liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Meet Your Moderator - Kallus Rourke   
    There is no cake in the hidden forums.
     
    But there is seafood. Namely fish and squid. 
  7. Original Light liked a post in a topic by JAM in Meet Your Moderator - Kallus Rourke   
    Meet Your Spam Bot: Kallus Rourke V-1.7839 Beta 3
  8. sixium liked a post in a topic by Original Light in September 11th   
    I think that's an easter egg integrated within LCPDFR itself, not GTA IV. I vaguely remember that, but an interesting find. Thanks for sharing. 
  9. sixium liked a post in a topic by Original Light in September 11th   
    I think that's an easter egg integrated within LCPDFR itself, not GTA IV. I vaguely remember that, but an interesting find. Thanks for sharing. 
  10. sixium liked a post in a topic by Original Light in September 11th   
    I think that's an easter egg integrated within LCPDFR itself, not GTA IV. I vaguely remember that, but an interesting find. Thanks for sharing. 
  11. Original Light liked a post in a topic by Hystery in Texas police chief asked to leave doctor's office for carrying gun   
    I thought everyone in Texas was a howdy cow-boy carrying a good ol' colt at their belt with a cow-boy hat and a hardly understandable accent. The more you know.
  12. Kallus Rourke liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Add a sub forum to tidy up this section   
    That would be a lot of manual labor for us, unless we just moved all locked topics to one section (which is an actual "select all" feature). 

    But for accuracy reasons, I think it would be difficult moving all legitimately solved issues and implemented suggestions into a separate sub-forum.
  13. Him1250 liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
     
    But a majority of people consider it to be among the best service cars ever designed. It was roomy, it was cheap, it was durable (and predictable as to what was going to break), and easy to work on. They were also slower than they should have been in the later generation (Ford should have upped the horsepower), and the handling was okay for a large car. Those were the two primary negatives. And they sure as hell didn't look new, either. They kept the same appearance from 1998 to 2011. If you tell someone that you own a 2011 Crown Victoria, they would most likely ask "Ford made 2011 Crown Vics!?!?" 
     
    Ford chose to neglect the car due to a global shift in increasing SUV sales and smaller FWD/AWD sedans.
     
    I know someone who runs a livery service with Lincoln Town Cars (same car, different badge) that put 500,000 miles on the original engine and transmission, other than replacing an intake manifold (they're notorious for leaking after abuse), and timing chains. They were also great taxi cabs after police service. 

    But the main thing is, most of its buyers were fleet buyers (90% in fact in the final model years). The general public did not want the car after the early-mid 2000's (other than the large cult following crowd it has in the United States and elsewhere). That's because it was incredibly outdated. If Ford did update it, I'd imagine it would of had more respectable sales figures compared to the 1980's and 1990's (the best decades for the panther platform in terms of sales).
     
    A lot of people here will agree with me, a lot of people will disagree with me. Some people will say the Taurus looks better, the Charger looks cooler, but I can confidently tell you that mechanically speaking (if we're going by engine break-down, straight forward reliability and cost effectiveness) the Crown Vic wins hands down.
     
    I'm going to do this using facts, not opinion. It used a cast iron block, low compression V8 engine. Something that is extinct. All newer engines use aluminum. Cast iron is significantly more durable, at the cost of displacing less heat and being heavier. A Ford engineer actually told me this (I knew it before, but he reinforced it). Newer engines will often use cast iron in critical areas, and aluminum in other areas, but it's not really the same.
     
     The lower compression ratio means the engine isn't going to be stressed, in comparison to a twin-turbo high compression EcoBoost engine. The transmissions are composed of 4 gears, significantly less moving parts to fail than your new run of the mill 8-speed automatic. The car rests on a body-on-frame platform, built in the same manner as many full-sized pickup trucks and SUV's. This allows for easier repairs after collisions. Yes, the car uses 1970's technology and design. But after reading this post, maybe 1970's technology is better for police work after all? Think about it.
     
    I can't sit here and tell you with a smug face that it was the best car ever made, that would be ignorant. But I can sure as hell tell you it's one of the best cars ever made.  Every cop I have talked to told me they liked the Crown Victoria better, especially here in Connecticut. Almost 6 years after discontinuation, it's still the second most common police car here in the state next to the Ford Explorer. That has to say something. And we're a rich state with huge police budgets, plenty of room to buy tons of new cars... but they seem to be holding on.
     
     
  14. Him1250 liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
     
    But a majority of people consider it to be among the best service cars ever designed. It was roomy, it was cheap, it was durable (and predictable as to what was going to break), and easy to work on. They were also slower than they should have been in the later generation (Ford should have upped the horsepower), and the handling was okay for a large car. Those were the two primary negatives. And they sure as hell didn't look new, either. They kept the same appearance from 1998 to 2011. If you tell someone that you own a 2011 Crown Victoria, they would most likely ask "Ford made 2011 Crown Vics!?!?" 
     
    Ford chose to neglect the car due to a global shift in increasing SUV sales and smaller FWD/AWD sedans.
     
    I know someone who runs a livery service with Lincoln Town Cars (same car, different badge) that put 500,000 miles on the original engine and transmission, other than replacing an intake manifold (they're notorious for leaking after abuse), and timing chains. They were also great taxi cabs after police service. 

    But the main thing is, most of its buyers were fleet buyers (90% in fact in the final model years). The general public did not want the car after the early-mid 2000's (other than the large cult following crowd it has in the United States and elsewhere). That's because it was incredibly outdated. If Ford did update it, I'd imagine it would of had more respectable sales figures compared to the 1980's and 1990's (the best decades for the panther platform in terms of sales).
     
    A lot of people here will agree with me, a lot of people will disagree with me. Some people will say the Taurus looks better, the Charger looks cooler, but I can confidently tell you that mechanically speaking (if we're going by engine break-down, straight forward reliability and cost effectiveness) the Crown Vic wins hands down.
     
    I'm going to do this using facts, not opinion. It used a cast iron block, low compression V8 engine. Something that is extinct. All newer engines use aluminum. Cast iron is significantly more durable, at the cost of displacing less heat and being heavier. A Ford engineer actually told me this (I knew it before, but he reinforced it). Newer engines will often use cast iron in critical areas, and aluminum in other areas, but it's not really the same.
     
     The lower compression ratio means the engine isn't going to be stressed, in comparison to a twin-turbo high compression EcoBoost engine. The transmissions are composed of 4 gears, significantly less moving parts to fail than your new run of the mill 8-speed automatic. The car rests on a body-on-frame platform, built in the same manner as many full-sized pickup trucks and SUV's. This allows for easier repairs after collisions. Yes, the car uses 1970's technology and design. But after reading this post, maybe 1970's technology is better for police work after all? Think about it.
     
    I can't sit here and tell you with a smug face that it was the best car ever made, that would be ignorant. But I can sure as hell tell you it's one of the best cars ever made.  Every cop I have talked to told me they liked the Crown Victoria better, especially here in Connecticut. Almost 6 years after discontinuation, it's still the second most common police car here in the state next to the Ford Explorer. That has to say something. And we're a rich state with huge police budgets, plenty of room to buy tons of new cars... but they seem to be holding on.
     
     
  15. Him1250 liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
     
    But a majority of people consider it to be among the best service cars ever designed. It was roomy, it was cheap, it was durable (and predictable as to what was going to break), and easy to work on. They were also slower than they should have been in the later generation (Ford should have upped the horsepower), and the handling was okay for a large car. Those were the two primary negatives. And they sure as hell didn't look new, either. They kept the same appearance from 1998 to 2011. If you tell someone that you own a 2011 Crown Victoria, they would most likely ask "Ford made 2011 Crown Vics!?!?" 
     
    Ford chose to neglect the car due to a global shift in increasing SUV sales and smaller FWD/AWD sedans.
     
    I know someone who runs a livery service with Lincoln Town Cars (same car, different badge) that put 500,000 miles on the original engine and transmission, other than replacing an intake manifold (they're notorious for leaking after abuse), and timing chains. They were also great taxi cabs after police service. 

    But the main thing is, most of its buyers were fleet buyers (90% in fact in the final model years). The general public did not want the car after the early-mid 2000's (other than the large cult following crowd it has in the United States and elsewhere). That's because it was incredibly outdated. If Ford did update it, I'd imagine it would of had more respectable sales figures compared to the 1980's and 1990's (the best decades for the panther platform in terms of sales).
     
    A lot of people here will agree with me, a lot of people will disagree with me. Some people will say the Taurus looks better, the Charger looks cooler, but I can confidently tell you that mechanically speaking (if we're going by engine break-down, straight forward reliability and cost effectiveness) the Crown Vic wins hands down.
     
    I'm going to do this using facts, not opinion. It used a cast iron block, low compression V8 engine. Something that is extinct. All newer engines use aluminum. Cast iron is significantly more durable, at the cost of displacing less heat and being heavier. A Ford engineer actually told me this (I knew it before, but he reinforced it). Newer engines will often use cast iron in critical areas, and aluminum in other areas, but it's not really the same.
     
     The lower compression ratio means the engine isn't going to be stressed, in comparison to a twin-turbo high compression EcoBoost engine. The transmissions are composed of 4 gears, significantly less moving parts to fail than your new run of the mill 8-speed automatic. The car rests on a body-on-frame platform, built in the same manner as many full-sized pickup trucks and SUV's. This allows for easier repairs after collisions. Yes, the car uses 1970's technology and design. But after reading this post, maybe 1970's technology is better for police work after all? Think about it.
     
    I can't sit here and tell you with a smug face that it was the best car ever made, that would be ignorant. But I can sure as hell tell you it's one of the best cars ever made.  Every cop I have talked to told me they liked the Crown Victoria better, especially here in Connecticut. Almost 6 years after discontinuation, it's still the second most common police car here in the state next to the Ford Explorer. That has to say something. And we're a rich state with huge police budgets, plenty of room to buy tons of new cars... but they seem to be holding on.
     
     
  16. TheDivineHustle liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    The Ford Fusion Hybrid Police Responder sedan may be good for very liberal cities like New York City and Los Angeles that want to drink the Democrat Party's Kool-Aid, but I doubt the cops will like those very much. The F150 Police Package is something I do agree with, I believe that goes on sale next year.
     
    The future of the Taurus is in the air. It may be discontinued, according to recent articles. Sales keep going down. I imagine they may still produce it for fleet only in the near future, like the Vic was fleet only 2007-2011. 
  17. Him1250 liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
     
    But a majority of people consider it to be among the best service cars ever designed. It was roomy, it was cheap, it was durable (and predictable as to what was going to break), and easy to work on. They were also slower than they should have been in the later generation (Ford should have upped the horsepower), and the handling was okay for a large car. Those were the two primary negatives. And they sure as hell didn't look new, either. They kept the same appearance from 1998 to 2011. If you tell someone that you own a 2011 Crown Victoria, they would most likely ask "Ford made 2011 Crown Vics!?!?" 
     
    Ford chose to neglect the car due to a global shift in increasing SUV sales and smaller FWD/AWD sedans.
     
    I know someone who runs a livery service with Lincoln Town Cars (same car, different badge) that put 500,000 miles on the original engine and transmission, other than replacing an intake manifold (they're notorious for leaking after abuse), and timing chains. They were also great taxi cabs after police service. 

    But the main thing is, most of its buyers were fleet buyers (90% in fact in the final model years). The general public did not want the car after the early-mid 2000's (other than the large cult following crowd it has in the United States and elsewhere). That's because it was incredibly outdated. If Ford did update it, I'd imagine it would of had more respectable sales figures compared to the 1980's and 1990's (the best decades for the panther platform in terms of sales).
     
    A lot of people here will agree with me, a lot of people will disagree with me. Some people will say the Taurus looks better, the Charger looks cooler, but I can confidently tell you that mechanically speaking (if we're going by engine break-down, straight forward reliability and cost effectiveness) the Crown Vic wins hands down.
     
    I'm going to do this using facts, not opinion. It used a cast iron block, low compression V8 engine. Something that is extinct. All newer engines use aluminum. Cast iron is significantly more durable, at the cost of displacing less heat and being heavier. A Ford engineer actually told me this (I knew it before, but he reinforced it). Newer engines will often use cast iron in critical areas, and aluminum in other areas, but it's not really the same.
     
     The lower compression ratio means the engine isn't going to be stressed, in comparison to a twin-turbo high compression EcoBoost engine. The transmissions are composed of 4 gears, significantly less moving parts to fail than your new run of the mill 8-speed automatic. The car rests on a body-on-frame platform, built in the same manner as many full-sized pickup trucks and SUV's. This allows for easier repairs after collisions. Yes, the car uses 1970's technology and design. But after reading this post, maybe 1970's technology is better for police work after all? Think about it.
     
    I can't sit here and tell you with a smug face that it was the best car ever made, that would be ignorant. But I can sure as hell tell you it's one of the best cars ever made.  Every cop I have talked to told me they liked the Crown Victoria better, especially here in Connecticut. Almost 6 years after discontinuation, it's still the second most common police car here in the state next to the Ford Explorer. That has to say something. And we're a rich state with huge police budgets, plenty of room to buy tons of new cars... but they seem to be holding on.
     
     
  18. Him1250 liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
     
    But a majority of people consider it to be among the best service cars ever designed. It was roomy, it was cheap, it was durable (and predictable as to what was going to break), and easy to work on. They were also slower than they should have been in the later generation (Ford should have upped the horsepower), and the handling was okay for a large car. Those were the two primary negatives. And they sure as hell didn't look new, either. They kept the same appearance from 1998 to 2011. If you tell someone that you own a 2011 Crown Victoria, they would most likely ask "Ford made 2011 Crown Vics!?!?" 
     
    Ford chose to neglect the car due to a global shift in increasing SUV sales and smaller FWD/AWD sedans.
     
    I know someone who runs a livery service with Lincoln Town Cars (same car, different badge) that put 500,000 miles on the original engine and transmission, other than replacing an intake manifold (they're notorious for leaking after abuse), and timing chains. They were also great taxi cabs after police service. 

    But the main thing is, most of its buyers were fleet buyers (90% in fact in the final model years). The general public did not want the car after the early-mid 2000's (other than the large cult following crowd it has in the United States and elsewhere). That's because it was incredibly outdated. If Ford did update it, I'd imagine it would of had more respectable sales figures compared to the 1980's and 1990's (the best decades for the panther platform in terms of sales).
     
    A lot of people here will agree with me, a lot of people will disagree with me. Some people will say the Taurus looks better, the Charger looks cooler, but I can confidently tell you that mechanically speaking (if we're going by engine break-down, straight forward reliability and cost effectiveness) the Crown Vic wins hands down.
     
    I'm going to do this using facts, not opinion. It used a cast iron block, low compression V8 engine. Something that is extinct. All newer engines use aluminum. Cast iron is significantly more durable, at the cost of displacing less heat and being heavier. A Ford engineer actually told me this (I knew it before, but he reinforced it). Newer engines will often use cast iron in critical areas, and aluminum in other areas, but it's not really the same.
     
     The lower compression ratio means the engine isn't going to be stressed, in comparison to a twin-turbo high compression EcoBoost engine. The transmissions are composed of 4 gears, significantly less moving parts to fail than your new run of the mill 8-speed automatic. The car rests on a body-on-frame platform, built in the same manner as many full-sized pickup trucks and SUV's. This allows for easier repairs after collisions. Yes, the car uses 1970's technology and design. But after reading this post, maybe 1970's technology is better for police work after all? Think about it.
     
    I can't sit here and tell you with a smug face that it was the best car ever made, that would be ignorant. But I can sure as hell tell you it's one of the best cars ever made.  Every cop I have talked to told me they liked the Crown Victoria better, especially here in Connecticut. Almost 6 years after discontinuation, it's still the second most common police car here in the state next to the Ford Explorer. That has to say something. And we're a rich state with huge police budgets, plenty of room to buy tons of new cars... but they seem to be holding on.
     
     
  19. Him1250 liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
     
    But a majority of people consider it to be among the best service cars ever designed. It was roomy, it was cheap, it was durable (and predictable as to what was going to break), and easy to work on. They were also slower than they should have been in the later generation (Ford should have upped the horsepower), and the handling was okay for a large car. Those were the two primary negatives. And they sure as hell didn't look new, either. They kept the same appearance from 1998 to 2011. If you tell someone that you own a 2011 Crown Victoria, they would most likely ask "Ford made 2011 Crown Vics!?!?" 
     
    Ford chose to neglect the car due to a global shift in increasing SUV sales and smaller FWD/AWD sedans.
     
    I know someone who runs a livery service with Lincoln Town Cars (same car, different badge) that put 500,000 miles on the original engine and transmission, other than replacing an intake manifold (they're notorious for leaking after abuse), and timing chains. They were also great taxi cabs after police service. 

    But the main thing is, most of its buyers were fleet buyers (90% in fact in the final model years). The general public did not want the car after the early-mid 2000's (other than the large cult following crowd it has in the United States and elsewhere). That's because it was incredibly outdated. If Ford did update it, I'd imagine it would of had more respectable sales figures compared to the 1980's and 1990's (the best decades for the panther platform in terms of sales).
     
    A lot of people here will agree with me, a lot of people will disagree with me. Some people will say the Taurus looks better, the Charger looks cooler, but I can confidently tell you that mechanically speaking (if we're going by engine break-down, straight forward reliability and cost effectiveness) the Crown Vic wins hands down.
     
    I'm going to do this using facts, not opinion. It used a cast iron block, low compression V8 engine. Something that is extinct. All newer engines use aluminum. Cast iron is significantly more durable, at the cost of displacing less heat and being heavier. A Ford engineer actually told me this (I knew it before, but he reinforced it). Newer engines will often use cast iron in critical areas, and aluminum in other areas, but it's not really the same.
     
     The lower compression ratio means the engine isn't going to be stressed, in comparison to a twin-turbo high compression EcoBoost engine. The transmissions are composed of 4 gears, significantly less moving parts to fail than your new run of the mill 8-speed automatic. The car rests on a body-on-frame platform, built in the same manner as many full-sized pickup trucks and SUV's. This allows for easier repairs after collisions. Yes, the car uses 1970's technology and design. But after reading this post, maybe 1970's technology is better for police work after all? Think about it.
     
    I can't sit here and tell you with a smug face that it was the best car ever made, that would be ignorant. But I can sure as hell tell you it's one of the best cars ever made.  Every cop I have talked to told me they liked the Crown Victoria better, especially here in Connecticut. Almost 6 years after discontinuation, it's still the second most common police car here in the state next to the Ford Explorer. That has to say something. And we're a rich state with huge police budgets, plenty of room to buy tons of new cars... but they seem to be holding on.
     
     
  20. Him1250 liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
     
    But a majority of people consider it to be among the best service cars ever designed. It was roomy, it was cheap, it was durable (and predictable as to what was going to break), and easy to work on. They were also slower than they should have been in the later generation (Ford should have upped the horsepower), and the handling was okay for a large car. Those were the two primary negatives. And they sure as hell didn't look new, either. They kept the same appearance from 1998 to 2011. If you tell someone that you own a 2011 Crown Victoria, they would most likely ask "Ford made 2011 Crown Vics!?!?" 
     
    Ford chose to neglect the car due to a global shift in increasing SUV sales and smaller FWD/AWD sedans.
     
    I know someone who runs a livery service with Lincoln Town Cars (same car, different badge) that put 500,000 miles on the original engine and transmission, other than replacing an intake manifold (they're notorious for leaking after abuse), and timing chains. They were also great taxi cabs after police service. 

    But the main thing is, most of its buyers were fleet buyers (90% in fact in the final model years). The general public did not want the car after the early-mid 2000's (other than the large cult following crowd it has in the United States and elsewhere). That's because it was incredibly outdated. If Ford did update it, I'd imagine it would of had more respectable sales figures compared to the 1980's and 1990's (the best decades for the panther platform in terms of sales).
     
    A lot of people here will agree with me, a lot of people will disagree with me. Some people will say the Taurus looks better, the Charger looks cooler, but I can confidently tell you that mechanically speaking (if we're going by engine break-down, straight forward reliability and cost effectiveness) the Crown Vic wins hands down.
     
    I'm going to do this using facts, not opinion. It used a cast iron block, low compression V8 engine. Something that is extinct. All newer engines use aluminum. Cast iron is significantly more durable, at the cost of displacing less heat and being heavier. A Ford engineer actually told me this (I knew it before, but he reinforced it). Newer engines will often use cast iron in critical areas, and aluminum in other areas, but it's not really the same.
     
     The lower compression ratio means the engine isn't going to be stressed, in comparison to a twin-turbo high compression EcoBoost engine. The transmissions are composed of 4 gears, significantly less moving parts to fail than your new run of the mill 8-speed automatic. The car rests on a body-on-frame platform, built in the same manner as many full-sized pickup trucks and SUV's. This allows for easier repairs after collisions. Yes, the car uses 1970's technology and design. But after reading this post, maybe 1970's technology is better for police work after all? Think about it.
     
    I can't sit here and tell you with a smug face that it was the best car ever made, that would be ignorant. But I can sure as hell tell you it's one of the best cars ever made.  Every cop I have talked to told me they liked the Crown Victoria better, especially here in Connecticut. Almost 6 years after discontinuation, it's still the second most common police car here in the state next to the Ford Explorer. That has to say something. And we're a rich state with huge police budgets, plenty of room to buy tons of new cars... but they seem to be holding on.
     
     
  21. Him1250 liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
     
    But a majority of people consider it to be among the best service cars ever designed. It was roomy, it was cheap, it was durable (and predictable as to what was going to break), and easy to work on. They were also slower than they should have been in the later generation (Ford should have upped the horsepower), and the handling was okay for a large car. Those were the two primary negatives. And they sure as hell didn't look new, either. They kept the same appearance from 1998 to 2011. If you tell someone that you own a 2011 Crown Victoria, they would most likely ask "Ford made 2011 Crown Vics!?!?" 
     
    Ford chose to neglect the car due to a global shift in increasing SUV sales and smaller FWD/AWD sedans.
     
    I know someone who runs a livery service with Lincoln Town Cars (same car, different badge) that put 500,000 miles on the original engine and transmission, other than replacing an intake manifold (they're notorious for leaking after abuse), and timing chains. They were also great taxi cabs after police service. 

    But the main thing is, most of its buyers were fleet buyers (90% in fact in the final model years). The general public did not want the car after the early-mid 2000's (other than the large cult following crowd it has in the United States and elsewhere). That's because it was incredibly outdated. If Ford did update it, I'd imagine it would of had more respectable sales figures compared to the 1980's and 1990's (the best decades for the panther platform in terms of sales).
     
    A lot of people here will agree with me, a lot of people will disagree with me. Some people will say the Taurus looks better, the Charger looks cooler, but I can confidently tell you that mechanically speaking (if we're going by engine break-down, straight forward reliability and cost effectiveness) the Crown Vic wins hands down.
     
    I'm going to do this using facts, not opinion. It used a cast iron block, low compression V8 engine. Something that is extinct. All newer engines use aluminum. Cast iron is significantly more durable, at the cost of displacing less heat and being heavier. A Ford engineer actually told me this (I knew it before, but he reinforced it). Newer engines will often use cast iron in critical areas, and aluminum in other areas, but it's not really the same.
     
     The lower compression ratio means the engine isn't going to be stressed, in comparison to a twin-turbo high compression EcoBoost engine. The transmissions are composed of 4 gears, significantly less moving parts to fail than your new run of the mill 8-speed automatic. The car rests on a body-on-frame platform, built in the same manner as many full-sized pickup trucks and SUV's. This allows for easier repairs after collisions. Yes, the car uses 1970's technology and design. But after reading this post, maybe 1970's technology is better for police work after all? Think about it.
     
    I can't sit here and tell you with a smug face that it was the best car ever made, that would be ignorant. But I can sure as hell tell you it's one of the best cars ever made.  Every cop I have talked to told me they liked the Crown Victoria better, especially here in Connecticut. Almost 6 years after discontinuation, it's still the second most common police car here in the state next to the Ford Explorer. That has to say something. And we're a rich state with huge police budgets, plenty of room to buy tons of new cars... but they seem to be holding on.
     
     
  22. Him1250 liked a post in a topic by Original Light in Was the Ford Crown Victoria the best police car ever?   
    Opinions are like assholes, everyone has one.
     
    But a majority of people consider it to be among the best service cars ever designed. It was roomy, it was cheap, it was durable (and predictable as to what was going to break), and easy to work on. They were also slower than they should have been in the later generation (Ford should have upped the horsepower), and the handling was okay for a large car. Those were the two primary negatives. And they sure as hell didn't look new, either. They kept the same appearance from 1998 to 2011. If you tell someone that you own a 2011 Crown Victoria, they would most likely ask "Ford made 2011 Crown Vics!?!?" 
     
    Ford chose to neglect the car due to a global shift in increasing SUV sales and smaller FWD/AWD sedans.
     
    I know someone who runs a livery service with Lincoln Town Cars (same car, different badge) that put 500,000 miles on the original engine and transmission, other than replacing an intake manifold (they're notorious for leaking after abuse), and timing chains. They were also great taxi cabs after police service. 

    But the main thing is, most of its buyers were fleet buyers (90% in fact in the final model years). The general public did not want the car after the early-mid 2000's (other than the large cult following crowd it has in the United States and elsewhere). That's because it was incredibly outdated. If Ford did update it, I'd imagine it would of had more respectable sales figures compared to the 1980's and 1990's (the best decades for the panther platform in terms of sales).
     
    A lot of people here will agree with me, a lot of people will disagree with me. Some people will say the Taurus looks better, the Charger looks cooler, but I can confidently tell you that mechanically speaking (if we're going by engine break-down, straight forward reliability and cost effectiveness) the Crown Vic wins hands down.
     
    I'm going to do this using facts, not opinion. It used a cast iron block, low compression V8 engine. Something that is extinct. All newer engines use aluminum. Cast iron is significantly more durable, at the cost of displacing less heat and being heavier. A Ford engineer actually told me this (I knew it before, but he reinforced it). Newer engines will often use cast iron in critical areas, and aluminum in other areas, but it's not really the same.
     
     The lower compression ratio means the engine isn't going to be stressed, in comparison to a twin-turbo high compression EcoBoost engine. The transmissions are composed of 4 gears, significantly less moving parts to fail than your new run of the mill 8-speed automatic. The car rests on a body-on-frame platform, built in the same manner as many full-sized pickup trucks and SUV's. This allows for easier repairs after collisions. Yes, the car uses 1970's technology and design. But after reading this post, maybe 1970's technology is better for police work after all? Think about it.
     
    I can't sit here and tell you with a smug face that it was the best car ever made, that would be ignorant. But I can sure as hell tell you it's one of the best cars ever made.  Every cop I have talked to told me they liked the Crown Victoria better, especially here in Connecticut. Almost 6 years after discontinuation, it's still the second most common police car here in the state next to the Ford Explorer. That has to say something. And we're a rich state with huge police budgets, plenty of room to buy tons of new cars... but they seem to be holding on.
     
     
  23. Original Light liked a post in a topic by Solo4oh6 in How to Increase Performance   
    I have 8GB and with the settings i use iam only at 3gb but still experience screen tearing.. im gunna try out your tips and see if it helps in my situation
     
    Amazing... all i did was switch it to borderless and now i dont have screen tearing.. thank u
  24. Original Light liked a post in a topic by Cyan in LSPDFR Search Results are Terrible   
    Yup, it really is awful sometimes isn't it. Calm down, that's just the software we use.
     
    Just learn to use Google a bit better, for example:
    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=inurl%3Awww.lcpdfr.com+ELS
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