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TrooperDan

Triangles or squares when creating 3d models for GTA?

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All 3d models I have ever used in GTA have always been constructed of three-sided polygons. I want to create a push bar to put on a car and was wondering should I be using triangles or squares. Are there any pros or cons to each, or is it just personal preference?

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So in the world of 3-D modeling, you can model two main ways you can create objects. You can use polygons, (which are 4 sided, but sometimes more), or you can use triangles (only 3 sided).

Benefits

  • Polygons
    • Sometimes good for creating smooth curves, or filling in square holes.
    • easier to manipulate than triangles.
  • Triangles
    • No hidden edges (a triangle is a plan so every triangle is completely flat).
    • What games use for polygon count and what they render.

Drawbacks

  • Polygons
    • Can contain hidden edges.
      • Since in the world of modeling, everything has to be definite, you have to break a model down to it's simplest form. Triangles are that simplest form. Because each triangle is completely flat (a plane), the program you're using and the game know exactly the coordinates of the three vertices, and can draw the area inbetween. However with a polygon, you can have a 4 sided shape, that is bent in a weird way and has unexpected edges because it will eventually be broken down and split up into triangles. (Every 4 sided polygon is broken down into 2 triangles).
  • Triangles
    • Can be harder to model with
    • More time consuming to model with

 

Moral of the story:

 

I suggest you model with 4 sided polygons, but it is not illegal to use triangles or a mix of the two. Most of my modeling is mainly 4 sided but sometimes I have to fill in some areas with triangles. Just make sure that the 4 sided polygons are flat, and are not bent in weird ways and you should be fine. And remember to weld!

- Happy modeling! :tongue:

 

TrooperDan likes this

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42 minutes ago, RoegonTV said:

So in the world of 3-D modeling, you can model two main ways you can create objects. You can use polygons, (which are 4 sided, but sometimes more), or you can use triangles (only 3 sided).

Benefits

  • Polygons
    • Sometimes good for creating smooth curves, or filling in square holes.
    • easier to manipulate than triangles.
  • Triangles
    • No hidden edges (a triangle is a plan so every triangle is completely flat).
    • What games use for polygon count and what they render.

Drawbacks

  • Polygons
    • Can contain hidden edges.
      • Since in the world of modeling, everything has to be definite, you have to break a model down to it's simplest form. Triangles are that simplest form. Because each triangle is completely flat (a plane), the program you're using and the game know exactly the coordinates of the three vertices, and can draw the area inbetween. However with a polygon, you can have a 4 sided shape, that is bent in a weird way and has unexpected edges because it will eventually be broken down and split up into triangles. (Every 4 sided polygon is broken down into 2 triangles).
  • Triangles
    • Can be harder to model with
    • More time consuming to model with

 

Moral of the story:

 

I suggest you model with 4 sided polygons, but it is not illegal to use triangles or a mix of the two. Most of my modeling is mainly 4 sided but sometimes I have to fill in some areas with triangles. Just make sure that the 4 sided polygons are flat, and are not bent in weird ways and you should be fine. And remember to weld!

- Happy modeling! :tongue:

 

Thanks for the detailed reply, just the information I was looking for! :)

RoegonTV likes this

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